How Bail Works in Utah

how bail works in utah

What is Bail?

When a person is arrested and taken into custody, the court system will set a date and time for a trial. This can be weeks or even months away. This can mean sitting in jail for the entire wait until the trial. However, the U.S. justice system allows for some defendants to be released by paying money as a financial guarantee to the courts as sort of an insurance policy that they will show up for their trial. This exchange of money is known as bail.

How Does Bail Work in Utah?

There are two ways to post bail money in Utah. The first way is to pay cash directly to the court system. This means whatever bail is set at for the defendant is what has to be paid in full. The other way is to pay for a surety bond. This is where a defendant’s representatives go to a bail bond company and pays them a fee and the company will pay the actual bail amount. This is a route for those who cannot afford the full amount of bail. The bail company is then held liable if the defendant does not show up for his court appearances and will bring the person back to jail. To get a bail bond, a person will need:

  • The Full Name of the defendant (not just a nickname or an alias)
  • The Location of the jail and its name
  • The number in which they were booked under
  • What they were charged with and the bail amount
  • Funds or collateral to make the payment

Once everything is set up and the bail bond agent is paid, they will head to the jail and pay for the defendant to get out. This can take a bit of time depending on what time it is and how busy the jail happens to be.

How Much Can Bail Cost?

Bail is determined by a number of factors, including criminal history, severity of crime, and type of offense. Utah has a uniformity code that lists specific bail amounts for certain offenses – see the Utah bail fee schedule here. For example, for a first time Class C Misdemeanor, bail is set at $340.00. The more severe the crime, the higher the bail can go. Felonies begin at $5,000 and go up depending on the degree.

Age is also a factor when it comes to bail. Juvenile defendants are on a different bail schedule which ranges from a minimum of $50 and can go up to $10,000 depending on the severity of the crime – see the Utah Juvenile bail fee schedule here.

Bad Boys Bail Bonds Utah Agents Are Here to Help

We here at Bad Boys Bail Bonds Utah agents are ready to assist you if you are in need of a bond agent in the state of Utah. We are open 24 hours a day and 7 days a week, 365 days a year. We work fast to get your loved one out of jail and are always professional. We feel that privacy matters on issues like this, so everything we do is private and discreet. Our hope is that you will never need our services, but understand that if you do you want the best possible; and that is the goal we strive for.

Other Bail Bond Blogs You May Be Interested In:

How immigration bail bonds work

7 frequently asked bail bonds questions answered

Prisoner rights vs prisoner privileges: what is the difference?

How Immigration Bail Bonds Work


U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) is the unit of the government that arrests and detains anyone found violating U.S. immigration law. In order for the detainee to be released until his or her court date, an immigration bond must be obtained. Detainees must first meet the qualifications before they can receive an immigration bail bond, though, which we will go over in this article. In addition, the ICE can release the detainee based on what is known as personal recognizance, which is a promise they make saying they’ll be present for all court appearances and will not partake in illegal activities while out on bail, and it doesn’t cost anything. Whenever the immigration judge (or the ICE) sets a required bond amount, however, it’s time to think about obtaining an immigration bond. It is the job of an immigration bail bondsman to help detainees through the process of obtaining one and to post bail for them.

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Someone Got Arrested, What to Do Next?


How to Bail Someone Out of a Utah Jail

Jail is one of the last places we ever want to see our loved ones. The uncertainty surrounding the whole jail experience affects not only the inmate, but it is often very stressful for their friends and family. If you find yourself in this situation, Bad Boys Bail Bonds Utah wants to provide you with the information you need so that the bail bond process goes as quickly as possible, and you can be reunited with your loved one.

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State Versus Federal Bail Bonds: Utah


If you have ever been arrested, you understand the freedom “posting bail” provides; it prevents the defendant from sitting in a jail cell until a judge is available for the bail hearing. It gives the defendant a chance to spend time with loved ones, make arrangements, and take care of unfinished business before being potentially incarcerated. It also allows defendants to return to work and preserve their job.

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7 Frequently Asked Bail Bonds Questions ANSWERED

7 Frequently Asked Bail Bonds Questions ANSWERED

What Should I Know Before I Contact a Utah Bail Agent?

Getting mixed up with legal trouble can be scary and confusing especially if you are not sure of how to post bail to get out. Bad Boys Bail Bonds Utah is able to assist in posting bails, navigating the bail system, and help your loved ones figure out what they need to even begin.

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Factors Judges Consider When Setting Bail Amounts

Factors Judges Consider When Setting Bail Amounts

How is the Utah Bail Schedule Determined?

The first person you call when you’ve been arrested is likely your lawyer. If your alleged crime is severe, though, you’ll probably need to make a call to a bail bondsman. Not all crimes warrant the need of a bail bondsman. Minor offenses may allow the officers at the jail to issue a standard bail amount and release an arrestee with little or no time in a jail cell. Jailhouses usually have a bail schedule that they refer to for minor offenses. Serious offenses, however, may require a bail hearing by a judge. In this scenario, the arrestee waits in a jail cell until the judge is available. Several factors go into a judge’s bail determination.

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Your Role as a Co-Signor of a Utah Bail Bond

Your Role as a Co-Signor of a Utah Bail Bond

What Does Co-signing a Bail Bond Mean?

Co-signing a bail bond entails signing a promissory note or an indemnity agreement which financially obligates you to pay the entire bail amount if the accused person or persons do not appear in court. After co-signing the bail bond, the accused will subsequently be released from detention during the resolution period in which his or her charges will be heard in a court of law. Two important points about co-signing:

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Can Cops Lie?


When you’re talking to a police officer or a suspected police officer, you need to keep yourself legally safe. To do this, you need to know what your legal rights are, and which myths about cops are true. Here’s what you need to know about speaking to the cops.

Conversations With Police Officers

KnowYourRights_v4Your conversation with a police officer will vary depending on the circumstances. Generally, there are three situations when you’ll speak to a cop:

  • General conversations

If there’s a crime or investigation, police officers may question nearby citizens. You have no legal obligation to respond to their questions, and may politely decline. Lying, however, is considered obstruction of justice.

  • You’re detained

You’re considered detained when a police officer has shown enough authority that you are no longer clear to leave. This could occur if you’re pulled over, or if an officer asks you to stop walking. At this point, you still have the option of silence. You should avoid moving on until given express consent to leave.

  • You’re under arrest

Arrests are when you’re held against your will. This means being handcuffed or brought to the station. It deprives you of your right to move around freely, but your right of silence remains.

In these situations, the safest thing you can legally say is something along these lines: “I wish to invoke my right of silence. I want to talk to my lawyer.” At this point, police officers will be required by law to stop. If they don’t, repeat your phrase politely until they stop.

The Myth That Cops Can’t Lie

The biggest reason to invoke your right of silence is because cops can legally lie. The fact that they must answer ‘are you a cop’ truthfully is a myth. It it was true, undercover operations would be pointless.

Cops can claim they have evidence, witnesses, or confessions that they actually don’t have. If you find yourself in this situation, just repeat that you wish to remain silent and speak to your lawyer. It’s your best legal defense.

By law, entrapment occurs when an officer uses overbearing coercion to incriminate you. This means using tactics that would cause most people to plead guilty, regardless of if they’re guilty or not. Specific entrapment laws vary by state.

Will Cops Charge You If You’re Uncooperative?

Another common myth is that a police officer will charge you if you decline to speak with them. Actually, police officers aren’t able to make any charges against you. They’re only able to make recommendations. The prosecutor is the person who’s able to bring charges against you.

This makes it even more important that you don’t give away any unnecessary information. Many criminals end up getting charged because of the evidence they gave away willingly!

Safely Interacting With Police Officers

No matter how brief your conversation with an officer is, you need to know how to safely interact with them. A police officer’s biggest concern is safety. Therefore, your actions should ensure that they feel completely at ease. An officer who is nervous will be much tougher to deal with.

Here are some tips for safely dealing with cops:

  • Keep your hands in view at all times. Don’t place them in your pockets.
  • Don’t make any sudden movements. If you need to reach for something, do so slowly.
  • Never touch any police equipment – this is threatening. This includes police animals, flashlights, and vehicles.
  • Remain calm and collected.

At Bad Boys Bail Bonds Utah, we believe you’re innocent until proven guilty, and we treat you that way. If you do catch yourself on the wrong side of the law, we’re here to assist you with any bail bond needs. For your convenience, we’re open 24/7, 365 days a year.

Prisoner Rights vs Prisoner Privileges: What Is the Difference?

inmate rights vs privlages

Recently Greg Holt, an inmate in Arkansas, sought to grow a beard for religious purposes, which is denied to inmates except for those who cannot shave due to medical problems.  Is this a right or a privilege?  And if it is a privilege, do all inmates all get the same access to privileges?

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Bad Boys Bail Bonds Reflects On Ten Years in Business


Bad Boys Bail Bonds Utah is a family owned bonding agency that began in 2005. This year we are celebrating our 10 year anniversary. We started the business after witnessing people who had made minor legal mistakes being treated like nothing more than a dollar sign. We realized that we could be part of the problem, or part of the solution. We help families navigate the complex legal system and get their loved ones back to their regular lives and jobs. Being in the bail bonds business is rewarding to provide a service people depend on.

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